PNA March Meeting

PNA Meeting at the On Point space

PNA Meeting at the On Point space

The Point Neighborhood Association holds meetings on the last Monday of each month, recently at the On Point center on Leavitt Street. All are welcome!

Last Monday’s meeting began with refreshments and a review of our local government. The main guest was Larry Ramdin of the Health Department, who continued the effort to distribute information. (The lack of knowledge of services offered, from available loans to the dual stream mandatory recycling system, persists as a barrier to civic involvement.) Larry noted certain rights:

“If you have an issue that your landlord is not taking care of, call my department.  Everyone is entitled to good housing.”

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“Due to people working long hours! people don’t get to vaccination hours; we want to plan services around what will work for people.”

An example of a city service designed to meet people’s needs is the consolidation of street sweeping with electronic waste, like television sets, pick up; for the effort to work, residents need to be aware of the service offered, Larry noted.  Lucy and the PNA said that as soon as a date is set, there will be no problem in spreading the word. When a resident asked for street sweeping to occur per side of the street, rather than on both sides at once, which causes parking hardships in the already dense area, Councilman Bob McCarthy noted that in the Point neighborhood, the City of Salem also employs leaf-blower services to gather sidewalk debris. This service is unique for The Point and precludes the possibility of one sided street sweeping. The service also only happens twice a season, unless specially scheduled for more times on a street by street basis.

In general wind blown trash is a problem; as are absentee landlords. But the combination results in a general lack of accountability. Larry suggested that devoted citizens could instill a sense of responsibility by persistently picking up trash, especially in front of neighborhood members that may have dropped the rubbish. The amorphous, but necessary desire is a change in behavior of some of the heaviest users of the neighborhood’s public space. I noted that the Palmer Street “Imagine a Lot” project did instill a civic awareness, at least on that lot durning the time of the project since the community participated in its making.

There are many efforts to “clean up” The Point, including proposed strategic development on Congress Street. This Thursday, the North Shore Community Development Coalition organizes the fun and effective Youth Get To The Point Day. Cleaning up a neighborhood is a form of stewardship, perhaps the gateway practice to deeper forms of citizenship too. For clean up problems on all days, make sure to contact Larry and the Health Department: (978) 741-1800, or walk over to 120 Washington Street, fourth floor.

Joint the next PNA meeting, April 28 at 6pm, for the Neighborhood Launch Party to implement the information gleaned during last year’s Point Visioning and Action Plan.

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