Recycling Games at the Lot!

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On Friday, October 11, the games began on the stumps with some clear rules of Recycling Do*s and Don’t*s. The kids were all ears; t-shirts and blue bins could be won. And Recycling Lore. IMG_6566

The Salem Recycling Committee presented the facts. And then the games began: three groups ran, yelled, and aimed to get the right recycling materials in the proper bins. Action packed.
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Can’t quite remember who won the game, but a great deal of knowledge was learned by all. Not to mention the fun had.IMG_6570 IMG_6571 IMG_6572

After the games, many got t-shirts and some won one of six blue bins. As recycling is now mandatory in Salem, and The Point is its most dense neighborhood, this was a good beginning towards a shift away from the throwing away of all things to a more thoughtful approach to waste management. In fact, as the kids learned, one person’s trash is another’s raw material for entirely new creations!IMG_6576 IMG_6579

The players even helped distribute the information in English and Spanish. If you missed it, the main points are posted on the Point Bulletin Board – go have a look.
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Soil report at Palmer Street Lot: The Installation

Since the soil report is in, we know there is no lead, but the soil lacks nutrients.

installation view 1

Salem Public Space Project asks: What can grow in this lot? Residents can pull up a chair and read all about it!

Resident sits to read the report!

Resident sits to read the report!

The Lot: What Can Grow Here?

Last Saturday, at the Easter Egg Hunt in Mary Jane Lee Park, many residents expressed a desire to see a garden, or at least grass growing, on the empty lot at 38-40 Palmer street, directly across from the park.

Digging for Samples

Digging for Samples

 

In an effort to determine what can grow on this lot, quite literally, the Salem Public Space Project started to dig. The University of Massachusetts, Amherst, offers an affordable Soil Test to determine toxins, nutrients, and the growth potential of a lot.

So we dug some samples!

The sample digs

The sample digs

We also decided to test our own garden soil to see what we’re working with at home, and the difference between the garden and lot soil are striking in color and texture.

Soil Samples